Wisconsin residents dealing with the prospect of being laid off have a lot of things to think about, but one of the most important details they’ll have to deal with is their severance package. It includes any remaining compensation and benefits that people receive once they’ve been laid off.

Some people assume that they have to take what’s offered in a severance agreement, but there are things that they can do to make the package as attractive as possible. They may also be able to file a case against their employer if an agreement cannot be reached.

One thing that people can do is review their work history. If an individual’s work history was exemplary or recorded as “good,” yet notes included in his or her severance agreement implied that his or her performance was subpar, that person may be able to challenge the severance agreement. People who are laid off through no fault of their own may be able to negotiate a better severance agreement.

People who have been laid off should try to determine the areas of the company that can be flexible when it comes to severance terms. Some businesses extend health benefits for a set number of months after a layoff, but some employees may be able to get those benefits extended even further or at least have the employer enhance the benefits package so that those costs can be offset. Some people may lose pay for accrued vacation days that they haven’t taken if they don’t know to negotiate or ask for it.

Getting laid off can be a stressful situation, but handling the details of the severance agreement can help a person navigate closing out the details of the current chapter and moving onto the next. Working with a law firm that has experience with severance agreements may make that possible.

Pin It on Pinterest